The magnificant Cliffhouse Self Catering shown between The Cliffs of Moher and Lahinch Golf Club, County Clare
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Geological & Natural Attractions

The Cliffs of Moher
Cliffs of Moher are located at the south-western edge of The Burren area near Doolin. The cliffs rise 120 m above the Atlantic Ocean at Hag's Head and extend for a distance of eight kilometers and to a height of 214 m. The Cliffs are a significant tourist attraction, and there is a visitor center and parking lot on the site managed by Shannon Heritage, which also operates O'Brien's Tower. A largely unenclosed walking trail runs along the top edge of the entire length of the cliffs, skirting private grazing lands and often running within mere meters of a sheer drop off into the ocean.

The Burren
The Burren is an amazing place. It is a karst limestone region of approximately 300 sq km which lies in the North West corner of Co Clare, in Ireland. It is composed of limestone pavements, which are eroded in a distinctive pattern known as karren. This pavement is crisscrossed by cracks known as grykes and underneath the pavement there are huge caves and rivers that suddenly flood when it rains. It contains dozens of megalithic tombs and Celtic crosses and a ruined Cistercian Abbey from the 12th century, Corcomroe.You can find villages abandoned since famine times and green roads on which you can walk for miles without ever seeing a car. And if you go in springtime you will find rare wildflowers such as gentian and orchids and bloody cranesbill.

Aillwee Caves
Unlike the vast caverns you may have encountered, Aillwee Cave is unique to the geology of the Burren and it enables you to explore a little of what lies under the exciting landscape. This stunning creation of nature was formed by the melt waters of a prehistoric ice age. The cave, carved out of limestone cuts into the heart of the mountain. The story of Aillwee Cave began millions of years ago when streams sinking underground on Aillwee Mountain started dissolving channels through the lines of weakness in the limestone. About one million years ago the ice age began and from then until fifteen thousand years ago Ireland's climate alternated between arctic coldness and warmer periods, freezing and melting, freezing and melting over the centuries. This melting water roared and crashed its way through an underground channel greatly enlarging the passage and bringing with it large quantities of sand and silts which are still present in the inner cave today

Aran Islands
Here, on the very edge of Europe, is an Island rich in the language, culture and heritage of Ireland, unique in its geology and archaeology and in its long tradition of gentle hospitality. Here is a place to sense the spirit of Gaelic Ireland, to touch the past, but with all the comforts and facilities of the present. Aran will take you back to an Ireland of Celts and Early Christians. This is an island of great peace and tranquillity, but it is also an island of great fun and activity.  A timeless land in an endless sea, weathered monuments on awesome cliffs, great labyrinths of limestone, meandering walls, patchwork fields, quiet beaches and a welcoming island people, this is Aran in Galway bay on the west coast of Ireland...

River Shannon
Dividing Ireland almost in two and dominating the midlands landscape, the River Shannon has acted as a formidable barrier to movement from East to West while providing a marine highway from North to South. It is the longest river in both Ireland and Britain, and has influenced the military, social and economic history of  Ireland since the beginning of  time. Travelling over 200 miles from its source to the sea, it is home to over a dozen lakes and more then a hundred islands. It is joined on its journey by dozens of smaller rivers and streams some of which are also navigable.
 

The Doolin Stalactite
Poll-an-Ionain, near Lisdoonvarna, is a difficult cave to explore and has inside it a huge stalactite nearly 25 feet long - the longest in western Europe. The Clare caves are definitely not for the casual visitor owing to the many narrow water floored passages. Pollnagollum is sited on the east side of Slieve Elva in the townland of Caherbullog and is a wide funnel-shaped hole about a hundred feet deep. A fixed rope enables one to scramble down some seventy feet on to a sloping area covered in ferns and mossy stones. To the left under a cliff is the main shaft which must be descended by rope ladders.

 

 
 

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Cliffs of Moher
Cliffs of Moher

The Burren County Clare
The Burren

Ailwee Caves
Ailwee Caves

Aran Islands
Aran Islands

Doolin Stalactite
Doolin Stalactite

 

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